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Old 26 Jul 2003, 11:06 AM   #1
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Default Dual Layer Discs

I have a Sony DRUI-510A recorder drive and I have been researchign this whole backup process, as well as to create my own movies in a professional way. My question is... what exactly is dual layer and does it require a special burner? or just special discs?
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Old 26 Jul 2003, 11:49 AM   #2
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"what exactly is dual layer and does it require a special burner? or just special discs?"

Dual layer DVDs (NOT to be confused with "Double-Sided" DVDs) are the COMMERCIAL DVDs you may have seen, that have a "gold" colored recording surface. Commercial DVD pressing technology allows up to 9.4Gbs to be recorded on one of these DVDs (as opposed to 4.7Gbs on a "silver" surfaced commercial DVD).

Dual layer DVDs are not available for burning by folks like us, so don't worry about a special burner or special DVDs...

If you desire to create a copy of a dual layer DVD, you have two options:

1) You can use a compression program (DVDShrink [freeware], DVD2One [commercial], DVD95Copy [commercial], etc.) to do a remarkably good job of compressing the contents of a 9.4Gb DVD to fit on a 4.7Gb burnable DVD

2) You can use a program (DVDFabToolbox [freeware and commercial versions] or Pinnacle InstantCopy [commercial], etc.) to, without any compression, split the 9.4Gb DVD's contents in half, ready for burning to two DVDs
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Old 27 Jul 2003, 07:17 AM   #3
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That doesn't answer my question. I already know that I will not be able to find these discs since no one ever talks about purchasing them. And since it is something that the Entertainment industry can use to have a leg up on the consumers, they of course will not release such a thing to the public, until the time when it may be necessary, such as they have something even better. It also doesn't take these forums to figure out what current options I have for backing up a DVD, the articles section takes care of that nicely. I was simply looking for an answer as to what this "pressing technology" is really doing. Instead, you decided to jump around the real question, dismissing my real interest. You say not to "worry" about this and I don't. But I am damn curious, so i'd still like a real answer. Unless of course you don't have one.

Is it a special film? Is it a compression algorithm? or is it a special laser altogether which simply writes the disc in an entirely different way? I would assume that the latter is false since I was able to immediately view a dual layer disc upon their release without any new hardware or modification to my existing DVD-playing hardware.

I want to thank you for your time and patience.
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Old 27 Jul 2003, 07:55 AM   #4
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"It also doesn't take these forums to figure out what current options I have for backing up a DVD, the articles section takes care of that nicely."

"Instead, you decided to jump around the real question, dismissing my real interest."


In light of the fact that the following was your question (verbatim), "My question is... what exactly is dual layer and does it require a special burner? or just special discs?", it's rather surprising that you are of the opinion that it hasn't been addressed.


You are now asking a different question, to wit:
"Is it a special film? Is it a compression algorithm? or is it a special laser altogether which simply writes the disc in an entirely different way?"

Perhaps another poster can provide you with a satifactory response...
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Old 27 Jul 2003, 10:51 AM   #5
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Well, ok, perhaps you did address it. However, I was looking for a more detailed explanation rather than what appeared to be obvious; that it is a manufacturing process that we don't have access to. I appologize for any confusion.

I found a great little article that explains exactly what it is with pictorial detail. You might find it interesting yourself.

http://www.pctechguide.com/10dvd.htm
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Old 27 Jul 2003, 11:18 AM   #6
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"I found a great little article that explains exactly what it is"

Congratulations on finding your desired information...
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Old 6 Aug 2003, 03:03 AM   #7
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Pressed DVD's are created using pressure from a pressing machine. there is no physically burning of the discs meaning no need for an organic dye or solution to be rpesent on the disc. The machines are very expensive and so are the discs, if you were to buy one off's. I would wait until the HD DVD systems come out and you wont have worry about it.
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