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Old 9 Jan 2002, 08:47 AM   #1
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Default Encoding using TMPEnc to optimize ability to edit

The question is:

What is the optimal setting (GOP structure, sequence heading, scene detection) on TMPEnc in order to generate MPEG-2 files that can be easily edited and re-rendered?

Backgound:

I am using TMPEnc to encode AVI files from my digital camcorder into VBR MPEG-2 files. I want to use the MPEG-2 format to save the files on CD-ROM for editing in the future. I find the AVI files to large to be able to load more than an hour on my hard drive. However, when I use my NL editor (VideoWave) to edit the files it hangs, or is 100x slower at rendering the final file. I think that VideoWave uses I-picture-only MPEG framing (very inefficient, but easy to edit). I have tried using a GOP sequence header interval of 1, and selected the "output bitstream for edit (closed GOP), with a standard frame "IBBPBBPBBPBBPBBP", and have had some success, but wanted to see if anyone on the forum has had better results.

There seem to be a lot of experienced video people on this forum, so any clarification that could be provided about the GOP sequence header interval would be appreciated.
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Old 9 Jan 2002, 09:36 PM   #2
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this suggestion might not be good but here goes..try using a codec called "huffy uv"..you can get it somewhere on "vcdhelp.com" you can put your vid into vdub and compress the avi with no loss in quality..huffy is a lossless codec.i actually take the time to save the uncompressed captured "yet huge" avi's onto discs if i need to.btw..what version of videowave is it..i have v.3 and it sucks so i use premier now.but i use videowave just to capture.also..this might be a better question for editing forums.
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Old 10 Jan 2002, 05:27 AM   #3
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I am using Videowave 5 and I am happy enough with the ability to create timelines, transitions and text titles. If I had a DVD-Writer and 200G hard disk I would do everything with AVI files. What I don't like is the quality of the MPEG encoders. I was really impressed with the TMPEnc. Does Premiere have comparable quality on the MPEG encoders? Can it edit MPEG files easily? I thought it had more to do with the way the MPEG files were encoded because I have no problem editing the MPEG files created by Videowave. I also know that there are issues with editing MPEG files (this is mentioned by Adobe in their documentation as well). This is why I was asking about the IPB formating, which has a lot to do with the quality/byte and the ability to look at individual frames.

I will try the AVI compression tool you mentioned.

Thanks v. much
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Old 10 Jan 2002, 06:27 AM   #4
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i have noticed that so far that when encoding with all the editing programs they kinda suck so i save as uncompressed avi and then encode with tmpg. tmpg also can save as avi. the reason why i stay with avis is because even with a mpeg2 it is compressed and then you are gonna edit and then render again and recompress it and its gonna look like crap. i have had no trouble editing any mpeg with any editing programs.i have used videowave, ulead video studio 4, and premier.btw i only have a cd burner and a 16 gig hard drive.i hope someone else can answer your original question better.i also wanna check out your vids.
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Old 16 Jan 2002, 05:21 AM   #5
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I tried viddub and the huffy encoder, but have a problem with getting sound. I have a DV camera and apparently viddub does not fully support the DV-1 format. I tried the Premiere download, but it isn't much better at working with MPEG files. I guess all the forward and backward predictions make it a very awkward format. Anyhow, I am planning to use the following strategy:

1) Encode using TMPGEnc for MPEG-2 files (best quality/compression I have seen). I will use the GOP force setting and scene detector to put 3 I-pictures at every scene change.

2) Use the scene detector on Videowave to generate a scene catalog (will take some manual rework to get the scenes aligned properly with the triple I-picture boundary).

3) Save the results onto CD-ROM (the MPEG file and the DSC file from Videowave).

4) Whenever I want to build a video, I will select the scenes I want and then render them as a DV file.

5) Once the DV file has been rendered, I will be able to quickly add transitions, etc. Most NLEs seem very fast at dealing with those giant DV files.

I will do steps 1-3 for all my raw video, and once I have done it once (will be a lengthy task), I will be able to pick and choose scenes at will to compile video. As far as I could see, Premiere doesn't have any kind of scene detection feature. Let me know if I am wrong. Also, let me know if you know of a workaround for the viddub problems with DV files.

Thanks,
ralla.
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