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Thread: How preserve 16:9 when making d2v file with DVD2AVI?

  1. #1
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    Default How preserve 16:9 when making d2v file with DVD2AVI?

    I am new in this job, but I was trying to obtain a d2v file with DVD2AVI and then process it with VFAPI to get a fake avi file.

    DVD2AVI sais that the film is PAL 16:9, but the d2v resulted looks different, is more square. Because of that lengthening, the quality of the image is poor.

    I don't think that I should use the filter "crop" from VirtualDub. Or should I? And if the filter "resize" could do the job, how do I set it up?

    I also tried using the "Clip&Resize" option in dvd2avi, before saving the project, but the resulted d2v looks the same, it isn't 16:9 when opening the file in VirtualDub or Media Player.

    And one more question: after processing the video, do I have to multiplex it with the audio in order to obtain the final avi file?

    Thank you!

  2. #2
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    vfapi would NOT be my first choice - avisynth is much faster

    here's how to setup dvd2avi:

    http://www.atlandide.net/~uncasms/en...p?page=gordian

  3. #3
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    Thank you for the hint!

    I'm not sure, however, what you mean by the fact that avisynth would be faster.
    I haven't used avisynth but vfapi needs just a few seconds to make the fake avi file, from the d2v file made by dvd2avi.

    And concerning the settings of dvd2avi, I have used it exactly like it is indicated in the guide you suggested.

  4. #4
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    of course the creation of the pseudo-avi takes only seconds.
    but avisynth is much better for frameserving than vfapi.

    for the actual encoding process avisynth will work MUCH faster than vfapi - in particular the latest version 2.5x

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    thanks, Uncas

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    The best way to do this is to leave it in the project file (d2v) from DVD2AVI, and the next program you open it in, just resize it to the proper size. 16:9 and 4:3 are the same size on DVD's (720x480) because DVD players need it to be this size to play properly. If it's 16:9, it just stretches the picture according to what type of television that you have.
    In your case, just open the project file in whatever program you're using, and resize it to 640x360, and then do your neccesary cropping. That will give you the correct aspect ratio.

  7. #7
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    resize it to 640x360
    why this particular resolution?

    there's more than one 16:9 resolution.

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    I just used that as an example since that's the most popular size. If he so desires he could make it 720x404 and crop it then, or any size in-between or smaller... just do the math. I was just trying to help with the proper resolutions which is what I think he was asking for in the first place.

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    mark, my objection did not concern 640 vs 704 or 576

    16:9 could be 1:1,85 or 1:2,35 or....

    thus *doing the math* is only possible on the basis of those information.

  10. #10
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    Originally posted by UncasMS
    mark, my objection did not concern 640 vs 704 or 576

    16:9 could be 1:1,85 or 1:2,35 or....

    thus *doing the math* is only possible on the basis of those information.
    Which is why I told him to do the cropping AFTER he resized it.

  11. #11
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    Thank you both of you!
    I managed to do it right, i.e., in the right format, but the file is too big.
    I used the bitrate calculator that nandub uses and I entered the bitrate obtained to get a one cd avi. And the resulted file was 1,5 GB. Why?

  12. #12
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    you must have done something wrong since the calc is quit reliable.

    any log file you could post?

    tried gordianknot for setting up your transcoding?

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